Pokémon Collection
 Pokémon

 International Pokémon logo.svg

Pokémon is a series of video games developed by Game Freak and published by Nintendo and The Pokémon Company under the Pokémon media franchise. Created by Satoshi Tajiri with assistance from Ken Sugimori, the first games, Pocket Monsters Red and Green, released in 1996 in Japan for the Game Boy, and the main series of role-playing video games (RPGs), referred to as the "core series" by their developers, have continued on each generation of Nintendo's handhelds. The most recently released core series games, Pokémon Sword and Shield, were released worldwide on the Nintendo Switch on November 15, 2019.
You can now transfer your old Pokémon to 'Sun' and 'Moon' | Engadget
The core games are released in generations, each with different Pokémon, storylines, and characters. Remake of the games are usually released around a decade after the original versions for the latest console at the time. While the main series consists of RPGs developed by Game Freak, many spin-off games based on the series have been developed by various companies, encompassing other genres such as action role-playing, puzzle, fighting, and digital pet games.
Spruce Grove Public Library - Virtual Pokemon Club - Spruce Grove Public  Library
Pokémon is the world's largest media franchise, with successful anime series, movies, and merchandise, with spin-off game Pokémon Go having crossed 1 billion mobile game downloads worldwide. By November 24, 2017, more than 300 million Pokémon games had been sold worldwide on handheld and home consoles, across 76 titles, including spin-offs. As of March 2020, the series has sold over 368 million units worldwide. This makes Pokémon the second best-selling video game franchise, behind Nintendo's own Mario franchise.

Release timeline
1996 Red and Green
Blue
1997
1998 Yellow
Red and Blue
1999 Gold and Silver
2000 Crystal
2001
2002 Ruby and Sapphire
2003
2004 FireRed and LeafGreen
Emerald
2005
2006 Diamond and Pearl
2007
2008 Platinum
2009 HeartGold and SoulSilver
2010 Black and White
2011
2012 Black 2 and White 2
2013 X and Y
2014 Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire
2015
2016 Sun and Moon
2017 Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon
2018 Let's Go, Pikachu! and Let's Go, Eevee!
2019 Sword and Shield

 

 Pokémon Red Version and Pokémon Blue Version 

 File:Pokémon Red and Blue cover art.webp

Pokémon Red Version and Pokémon Blue Version are 1996 role-playing video games developed by Game Freak and published by Nintendo for the Game Boy. They are the first installments of the Pokémon video game series. They were first released in Japan in 1996 as Pocket Monsters: Red and Pocket Monsters: Green, with the special edition Pocket Monsters: Blue being released in Japan later that same year. The games were later released as Pokémon Red and Pokémon Blue in North America and Australia in 1998 and Europe in 1999.

The player controls the protagonist from an overhead perspective and navigates him throughout the fictional region of Kanto in a quest to master Pokémon battling. The goal of the games is to become the champion of the Indigo League by defeating the eight Gym Leaders and then the top four Pokémon trainers in the land, the Elite Four. Another objective is to complete the Pokédex, an in-game encyclopedia, by obtaining the 151 available Pokémon. Red and Blue utilize the Game Link Cable, which connects two Game Boy systems together and allows Pokémon to be traded or battled between games. Both titles are independent of each other but feature the same plot,[1] and while they can be played separately, it is necessary for players to trade between both games in order to obtain all of the original 151 Pokémon.

 Pokémon Yellow Version: Special Pikachu Edition

 Pokemon Yellow.png

Pokémon Yellow is an enhanced version of the Game Boy games Pokémon Red and Blue. Like its predecessors, it is a third-person, overhead perspective and consists of three basic screens: an overworld, in which the player navigates the main character; a battle screen; and a menu interface, in which the player configures their party of Pokémon, items, or gameplay settings. The player uses their Pokémon to battle other Pokémon. When the player encounters a wild Pokémon or is challenged by a trainer, the screen switches to a turn-based battle screen that displays the engaged Pokémon. During battle, the player may select one of up to four moves for their Pokémon to use, use an item, switch their active Pokémon, or attempt to flee. Pokémon have health points (HP); when a Pokémon's HP is reduced to zero, it faints and can no longer battle until it is revived. Once an enemy Pokémon faints, the player's Pokémon involved in the battle receive a certain number of experience points (EXP). After accumulating enough EXP, a Pokémon will level up. A Pokémon's level dictates its physical properties, such as the battle statistics acquired, and the moves learned.

 Pokémon Gold Version and Pokémon Silver Version

 Pokémon box art - Gold Version.png

Like previous installments, Pokémon Gold and Silver are played from a third-person, top-down perspective, with players directly navigating the protagonist around the fictional universe, interacting with objects and people. As the player explores this world, they will encounter different terrains, such as grassy fields, forests, caves, and seas in which different Pokémon species reside. As the player randomly encounters one of these creatures, the field switches to a turn-based "battle scene", where the Pokémon will fight.

There are two main goals within the games: following through the main storyline and defeating the Elite Four and Pokémon Master Lance to become the new Champion, and completing the Pokédex by capturing, evolving, and trading to obtain all 251 creatures. A major aspect of this is developing and raising the player's Pokémon by battling other Pokémon, which can be found in the wild or owned by other Trainers. This system of accumulating experience points (EXP) and leveling up, characteristic and integral to all Pokémon video games, controls the physical properties of the Pokémon, such as the battle statistics acquired, and the moves learned.

 

 Pokémon Crystal Version

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The gameplay of Pokémon Crystal is largely the same as in Gold and Silver, although it has several new features. It is the first Pokémon game to allow players to choose the sex of their character, while previously the character was always male. Pokémon have animated sprites; for example, when a Cyndaquil enters battle, the flames on its back flicker. This feature was absent in Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire and Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, before reappearing in Pokémon Emerald and all subsequent games. In addition, a couple of subplots were added, one involving the legendary Pokémon Suicune, featured on the front cover of the game, and the other involving the Unown. The game's most significant addition is the Battle Tower, a new building which allows players to participate in Pokémon Stadium-like fights. The Japanese edition of the game was exclusively bundled with the Mobile Adapter GB, a device that allowed for connecting with other players via a mobile phone.

 Pokémon Ruby Version and Pokémon Sapphire Version

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The gameplay is mostly unchanged from the previous games; the player controls the main character from an overhead perspective, and the controls are largely the same as those of previous games. As with previous games, the main objectives are to catch all of the Pokémon in the games and defeat the Elite Four; also like their predecessors, the games' main subplot involves the player character defeating a criminal organization that attempts to take over the region. New features, such as double battles, Pokémon abilities, and 135 new Pokémon were added. Owing to the increased capabilities of the Game Boy Advance, four players may be connected to each other at a time instead of the previous limit of two. Additionally, the games can be connected to an e-Reader or other third-generation Pokémon games.

 Pokémon FireRed Version and Pokémon LeafGreen Version

 Pokemon LeafGreen box.jpg

As with all Pokémon role-playing games released for handheld consoles, FireRed and LeafGreen are in a third-person, overhead perspective. The main screen is an overworld, in which the player navigates the protagonist. Here, a menu interface may be accessed, in which the player may configure his or her Pokémon, items, and gameplay settings.

When the player encounters a wild Pokémon or is challenged by a trainer, the screen switches to a turn-based battle screen that displays the player's Pokémon and the engaged Pokémon. During a battle, the player may select a move for their Pokémon to perform, use an item, switch their active Pokémon, or attempt to flee. All Pokémon have hit points (HP); when a Pokémon's HP is reduced to zero, it faints and can no longer battle until it is revived. Once an opponents Pokémon faints, all of the player's Pokémon involved in the battle receive a certain amount of experience points (EXP). After accumulating enough EXP, a Pokémon will level up.

 Pokémon Emerald Version

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The gameplay in Emerald is largely the same as in Ruby and Sapphire. Much of the game takes place in an overhead style; players' characters can move in four directions and can talk to other people on the overworld. Players can encounter wild Pokémon by walking into grass, surfing on their Pokémon, walking through caves, and other means.

They can also battle other trainers' Pokémon. When this happens, the game shifts to a battle screen where players and their Pokémon are seen on the front-left portion of the screen while opponents are viewed on the back-right portion. Stats of the Pokémon and their trainers are shown on the side of each participant; these stats include the Pokémon's levels, each trainers' number of Pokémon (from one to six), the Pokémon's health, and any status effects, such as poison, paralysis or burn.

Trainers send out the first Pokémon in their party and they take turns attacking where the first strike is determined usually by the speed of the two Pokémon. Players can choose from one of four options: Fight, Bag, Switch, and Run. Each Pokémon has up to four moves that they can use, which have different effects, number of uses, and types, such as Grass or Psychic. When a Pokémon hits 0 hit points (HP), they faint, forcing the Pokémon's trainer to switch out. Once one trainer runs out of Pokémon, the battle is over. When a human-controlled Pokémon wins a battle, the Pokémon gains experience. Enough experience will earn that Pokémon a higher level, which grants upgraded stats—attack, defense, special attack, special defense, HP, and speed—and sometimes grant new moves.

 

 Pokémon Diamond Version and Pokémon Pearl Version

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Pokémon Diamond and Pearl are role-playing video games with adventure elements. The basic mechanics of the games are largely the same as their predecessors. As with all Pokémon games for handheld consoles, the gameplay is in a third-person overhead perspective and consists of three basic screens: a field map, in which the player navigates the main character; a battle screen; and the menu, in which the player configures their party, items, or gameplay settings.

Players begin the game with no Pokémon or Poké Balls but are given the choice of three Pokémon as a part of the storyline. Once Poké Balls are obtained, the player can capture more Pokémon. Players can use their Pokémon to deal with damage to other Pokémon in battle. Whenever the player encounters a wild Pokémon or is challenged by a trainer to a battle, the screen switches to a turn-based battle screen where the Pokémon fight. During the battle, the player may use a move, use an item, switch the active Pokémon, or flee. Fleeing is not an option during battles against trainers. All Pokémon have hit points (HP); whenever a Pokémon's HP is reduced to zero, it faints and cannot battle unless revived at a Pokémon Center or with an item.

If the player's Pokémon defeats the opposing Pokémon by causing it to faint, it receives experience points. After accumulating enough experience points, it will level up; most Pokémon evolve into a new species of Pokémon whenever they reach a certain level. Pokémon's stats also increase every time it levels up, and they will also learn new moves at certain levels as well. If a Pokémon is prevented from evolving it will learn new moves faster.

 Pokémon Platinum Version

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Pokémon Platinum is a role-playing video game with adventure elements. Its basic mechanics are the same as those found in Diamond and Pearl. As with all Pokémon games for handheld consoles up to that point, the gameplay is in a third-person overhead perspective, and consists of three basic screens: a field map, in which the player navigates the main character; a battle screen; and the menu, in which the player configures their party, items, or gameplay settings.

Players begin the game with one Pokémon and can capture more using Poké Balls. The player can also use his or her Pokémon to battle other Pokémon. When the player encounters a wild Pokémon or is challenged by a trainer to a battle, the screen switches to a turn-based battle screen where the Pokémon battle. During a battle, the player may use a move, use an item, switch the active Pokémon, or flee. Fleeing is not an option during battles against trainers. All Pokémon have hit points (HP); when a Pokémon's HP is reduced to zero, it faints and cannot battle unless revived with a Pokémon skill or an item.

 Pokémon HeartGold Version and Pokémon SoulSilver Version

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In HeartGold and SoulSilver, the first Pokémon in the player's party can follow them in the overworld, echoing a mechanic in Pokémon Yellow where Pikachu follows the player. This mechanic was also used in a limited fashion in Pokémon Diamond, Pearl, and Platinum when the player is in Amity Park with a "cute" Pokémon.

The player may talk to the Pokémon to see or check on how that Pokémon is feeling, and occasionally it may pick up items. A new minigame called the Pokéathlon uses the Nintendo DS touchscreen and allows Pokémon to compete in events such as hurdling. The Japanese versions retain slot machines found in previous games, while the international releases of the titles replace the slot machines with a new game called "Voltorb Flip", described as a cross between Minesweeper and Picross. Another new item, the GB Sounds, changes the background music to the original 8-bit music from Pokémon Gold and Silver.

 Pokémon Black Version and Pokémon White Version

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The graphics have been improved from Diamond and Pearl. The dialog boxes of previous games have been changed to speech balloons that appear over other characters' heads, allowing more than one character to speak at once. Japanese players can have kanji appear on screen, rather than only hiragana and katakana.

During battles, the sprites of the Pokémon are fully animated and the camera changes position to highlight specific parts of the battle.[8] In addition to continuing the day and night cycle introduced in Gold and Silver, Black and White introduces a seasonal cycle, with the seasons advancing every month rather than being linked to the calendar. Outside areas appear differently depending on the season, such as changing of leaves in autumn or snow on the ground in winter.

Certain areas are only accessible during certain seasons, and different Pokémon can be found in the wild in winter where others are encountered in the other seasons. The Pokémon Deerling and Sawsbuck change their physical appearance to match the seasons.

 Pokémon Black Version 2 and Pokémon White Version 2

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A new game mechanic introduced in Black 2 and White 2 is the "PokéStar Studios" side-game, where the player character participates in the filming of a movie involving Pokémon and other actors. A character named Brycen-Man also appears, as Brycen from the original games returned to his movie career.

Another new mechanic is the Pokémon World Tournament, where the player battles powerful trainers from the previous games in the series, ranging from Gym Leaders Brock, Misty, Volkner, and Giovanni to Champions Cynthia, Steven, and Lance. Another new mechanic is the Key System, a feature that is unlocked after beating the game. With it, you can unlock difficulties and new additional areas like Black Tower or Whitetree within the same version. You can also unlock chambers, where you can capture Regirock, Registeel, and Regice.

 Pokémon X and Pokémon Y

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Pokémon X and Y are the first titles in the main series presented in fully 3D polygonal graphics, allowing for more interactivity with the overworld and more dynamic action during battles.

Players are also able to customize their Pokémon trainer's appearance, choosing gender, skin tone and hair color at the start of the game, and can later acquire outfits and accessories in-game to change their character's look. Joining the previous generations of Pokémon are all new species, such as the new starter Pokémon; Chespin, Fennekin and Froakie, and the Pokémon that are, within the fictional Pokémon world, described as legendary Pokémon, namely Xerneas, Yveltal and Zygarde.

Players will also be able to choose from one of the classic starter Pokémon from Pokémon Red and Blue later on in the game. The new Fairy-type is introduced for both new and old Pokémon, the first new type added to the series since Pokémon Gold and Silver. The game's developers stated the addition was used to balance the Dragon-type.

 Pokémon Omega Ruby and Pokémon Alpha Sapphir

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Though Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire are remakes of games from the third generation, they retain changes made in later generations, such as the type split from the fourth generation and unlimited TM usage and triple battles from the fifth generation. They also retain most of the features of Pokémon X and Y, such as Mega Evolution and Super Training.

The games introduced new features including Primal Reversion for Groudon and Kyogre, as well as using Latios or Latias to fly around Hoenn. When flying around on Latios or Latias players may encounter "mirage spots". These spots feature Pokémon not otherwise available in the Hoenn region, as well as numerous legendary Pokémon from previous generations.

 Pokémon Sun and Pokémon Moon

 Pokemon Sun Boxart.jpg

Pokémon Sun and Moon are role-playing video games with adventure elements, set in the fictional Alola region (loosely based on Hawaii), presented in a third-person, overhead perspective. The player controls a young trainer who goes on a quest to catch and train creatures known as Pokémon and wins battles against other trainers.

By defeating opposing Pokémon in turn-based battles, the player's Pokémon gains experience, allowing them to level up and increase their battle statistics, learn new battle techniques, and in some cases, evolve into more powerful Pokémon. Players can capture wild Pokémon, found during random encounters, by weakening them in battle and catching them with Poké Balls, allowing them to be added to their party.

Players are also able to battle and trade Pokémon with other human players using the Nintendo 3DS' connectivity features. As with previous games in the series, certain Pokémon are only obtainable in either Sun or Moon, with players encouraged to trade with others in order to obtain all Pokémon from both versions

 Pokémon Ultra Sun and Pokémon Ultra Moon

 Pokemon Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon cover art.jpg

Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon introduce new Ultra Beasts: Stakataka, Blacephalon, Poipole and its evolution, Naganadel. In addition, there are new forms for the legendary Pokémon Necrozma, dubbed "Dusk Mane" and "Dawn Wings" forms, which are achieved by absorbing the legendary Pokémon Solgaleo and Lunala, respectively; it is conceptually similar to Black and White Kyurem from Black 2 and White 2 and Lusamine's mutated form from the original Sun and Moon. Also, a new Lycanroc form was added, Dusk Lycanroc.

Players can now travel around the Alola region to collect Totem Stickers, which allow the player to receive a Totem-sized variant of a Pokémon. Three new activities have been added: Mantine Surf, which allows the player to surf across the region's seas—it also serves as an alternate way of earning Battle Points; Alola Photo Club, which allows players to take pictures of their player character with Pokémon in various poses; and Ultra Warp Ride, which allows the player to travel through varying Ultra Wormholes and encounter Ultra Beasts in their own worlds—in addition to finding legendary Pokémon from every game in the series, up to three times, and an increased chance for shiny Pokémon to appear.

New Z-Moves are available for multiple Pokémon, including Solgaleo, Lunala, Lycanroc, Mimikyu and Necrozma. An upgrade to the Rotom Pokédex adds Roto-Loto, which allows the player to use boosts, akin to O-Powers from the previous generation; and Z-Rotom Power, which allows players to use up to two Z-Moves per battle.

 

 Pokémon: Let's Go, Pikachu! and Pokémon: Let's Go, Eevee!

 Pokémon Let's Go, Pikachu! and Let's Go, Eevee!.jpg

Let's Go, Pikachu! and Let's Go, Eevee! feature common elements of the main series, such as battling non-player character Pokémon Trainers and Gym Leaders with caught Pokémon creatures.

However, when facing wild Pokémon, instead of battling them with the traditional battle system like in past games, the catching of Pokémon uses a system that is reminiscent of the mobile spin-off game Pokémon Go. By using the motion controls of the Joy-Con controller or Poké Ball Plus peripheral, players can throw berries to pacify a Pokémon or Poké Balls to attempt to capture it.

The action can also be performed with a button press when the Joy-Con controllers are docked to the console or in handheld mode, but this still requires using motion controls to aim.[8] If a player uses motion controls, the catching of Pokémon is based on the player's timing rather than accuracy. Although it is possible to miss a throw, the ball is almost guaranteed to make contact with the Pokémon. One notable difference in Let's Go, Pikachu! and Let's Go, Eevee! is that wild Pokémon show up in the overworld, rather than as random encounters in grass or in caves like in previous main series Pokémon role-playing games. To start an encounter with a wild Pokémon, the player must simply approach the Pokémon in the environment.

 Pokémon Sword and Pokémon Shield

 Pokémon Sword and Shield.jpg

Pokémon Sword and Shield are role-playing video games with adventure elements, and in most cases it is presented in a fixed camera, third-person perspective; in certain instances free camera movement is available. The player controls a young trainer who goes on a quest to catch and train creatures known as Pokémon, and win battles against other trainers.

By defeating opposing Pokémon in turn-based battles, the player's Pokémon gains experience, allowing them to level up and increase their battle statistics, learn new battle techniques, and in some cases, evolve into more powerful Pokémon. Players can capture wild Pokémon, found during wild encounters, by weakening them in battle and catching them with Poké Balls, allowing them to be added to their party. Players are also able to battle and trade Pokémon with other human players using the Nintendo Switch connectivity features.

As with previous games in the series, certain Pokémon are only obtainable in either Sword or Shield, with players encouraged to trade with others in order to obtain all Pokémon from both versions.

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